CHILDE HASSAM Allies Day, May 1917

Frederick Childe Hassam (October 17, 1859 – August 27, 1935) was a prominent and prolific American Impressionist painter, noted for his urban and coastal scenes. Hassam was instrumental in promulgating Impressionism to American collectors, dealers, and the museums. He produced over 3,000 paintings, watercolors, etchings, and lithographs in his career.  His most famous works are the “Flag” paintings, completed during World War I.

One month after the United States officially entered the First World War, the city of New York festooned Fifth Avenue with flags.  As a welcoming gesture to the British and French war commissioners, the Stars and Stripes hung alongside the Union Jack and the French tricolor to create a patriotic pattern of red, white, and blue.

Childe Hassam, an American of British descent who had studied and worked in Paris, took personal pride in the new military alliance. Allies Day, May 1917 is not Hassam’s only flag painting, but it quickly became (and has remained) the most famous of the ensemble. Color reproductions of it were sold to benefit the war effort. Americans wanted copies of this painting because it was beautiful art and to show support for America and its allies as they joined them in the war.

Allies Day May 1917 by Childe Hassam c. 1917

The PowerPoint  from February 22, 2011 CHILDE HASSAM allies Day May 1917

Looking forward to our next class.  Mrs. S

“The Lord is good.  His unfailing love continues forever, and His faithfulness continues to each generation.”  Psalm 100:5

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